Casa de Barco

I’m writing this entry from work today. Normally I would wait until I get home but I’m currently without wifi. You see, I finally moved to Satori and moved out of the house. Last Monday was the last day I had wifi access and it’s been a busy week since. Thursday and Friday I worked from home and was tethering internet from my iPhone because I had paid for seven gigabytes of hotspot data but I ran it out within two days. I guess you can consider me a high-bandwidth user, mainly due to the amount of internet is used for work. I even went through the effort of picking up a ubiquity bullet and antennae so I could boost signals coming from the businesses and other boats but surprisingly here in Seattle, there is nothing I can use sufficiently to surf the web. I guess the booster will get some use somewhere that actually provides free wifi. Ah Seattle, you amaze me with your tight-wad and paranoid ways. Fortunately Comcast provides internet to the marina. I absolutely despise Comcast with a vengeance but there is nothing else I can do. Pay the bastards and get back my badly needed internet or never work from boat again. Not an option.

Another great thing that has happened over the last week is some progress has been made on getting a new mainsheet installed. Satori can finally get back to sailing! I picked up a 4:1/8:1 block and cleat system for the traveler and XLS 3/8″ polyester double braid for the sheet. To measure the length needed for the mainsheet, you push the boom all the way out until it hits the spreaders and then multiply by eight (for the 8:1 system) and add twenty percent for extra line to work with. I may shorten it a bit when I do the end-to-end splice after taking it out for a test drive. It seems much longer than I need and can’t figure out why I needed to add twenty percent. Anyways, I’m happy with the setup and also the placement of the boom in the gallows cradle. Since I’m not going to use the center cradle anymore I can make my bimini arch higher which will shed water properly. So far I like the way it is installed with the exception of the snaps I installed. They keep coming unsnapped because of the amount of pressure on them so I think I will replace them with common sense fasteners so it’s drum tight and secured. I can’t wait to make up the next part this week.

Bimini with solar panel attached.
Bimini with solar panel attached.
New mainsheet set out of the way while parked.
New mainsheet set out of the way while parked.

On the list of projects is also some lee cloths for places where I can keep gear safe while underway. I made the first one which contains books, my violin and camera gear in the settee. I bought some really nice netting and 1″ polyester webbing and some nice stainless eye straps and clips. This will not prevent small items from escaping through the sides but will keep most things from falling out when the pitch is steep enough. Mainly just peace of mind for when the boat is underway and so I can keep things there without having to stow them.

Settee lee cloth
Settee lee cloth

Last Thursday I took the day off from moving as I’ve been going hard every day for the last month. A little rest and relaxation on an eighty degree day and I also climbed the mast to check out the masthead and spreaders. Everything checked out just fine. I also noticed that my slip neighbor has her boat turned away a little bit and Satori was sticking out quite a bit on her stern so I made some adjustments to pull her in a little more with a similar angle as the other vessel.

Satori parked at Shilshole Bay Marina
Satori parked at Shilshole Bay Marina
Shilshole Bay Marina panorama
Shilshole Bay Marina panorama

So far the live aboard life has been great. I took a shower for the first time since I installed the new shower drain and it worked great. The shower curtain is a quick drying hydrophobic fabric used on tents and sleeping bags and when I shook the water off it dried within an hour. The bathroom is all varnish and it also dried quickly so I am glad that it all worked out as planned. I don’t planning on showering on board very often but it’s nice to know I can and that the whole system works much better. There are some kinks to work out, like refinishing the shower pan board. It still smells like the old septic that was leaching into the wood back before I remodeled the bathroom but in time that one will also be ticked off.

I’m also back to commuting to work by bike. I did my first ride since last summer and it took only forty-five minutes. Another co-worker is commuting from Ballard and we’re planning on coming up with the best route to avoid the gridlock that occurs downtown around Union. Going from Shilshole to Denny is simple; take Dexter from Fremont. Getting through downtown is a different story. With proper planning I’d bet I can cut the commute down to thirty minutes. It’s not a matter of how fast I ride as there are still a number of stop lights to sit through.

Anyways, that’s all I have for now. Thanks for stopping by. Ask me anything that’s on your mind.

2 Replies to “Casa de Barco”

  1. I don’t remember in past posts but did you buy a sewing machine? If so, what make? Are you happy with the machine? I noticed the port light covers in your picture, are they fastened by an elastic band or a rope tie? Carl from Key West W32 hull 191.

    1. Hi Carl,

      I did buy a sewing machine back in March and have been putting it to good use. I bought the Sailrite LSZ-1. I’m very happy with it so far and actually decided to make it a permanent fixture of the boat. There are plenty of canvas projects remaining so I keep it in the pilot berth in the settee and secure it while under way. The port light covers do not have any elastic. The fabric is a cotton blend that I repurposed from curtains in my house and was bought at Ikea a few years ago. There is enough elastic to eliminate the need for a band and they stay on without issue. One suggestion however; I currently have a couple of different kinds that I can swap out, because on a normal day here in Seattle there isn’t a lot of sun but when the sun is out I switch to ones that will block the sun from going through the fabric. I just used the same Sunbrella 10oz marine grade fabric that my bimini and other covers and bags are made from. I’m guessing it blocks about ninety percent of the light and keeps the boat much cooler. Just a thought since you live in a much sunnier part of the world 🙂 Cheers.

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