Categories
Anchoring Cruising Dinghy Live Aboard Living Pacific Northwest San Juan Islands Winter

Free to Roam

A couple of days before departure

It’s a rainy Friday night with plenty of wind, and plenty of rain. I moved everything from the dock box to storage. The touring kayak my friend left here at the dock is back at his house. Anything that doesn’t belong on the boat is also in storage. I’ve been pecking away at the remaining stuff but the more I try to scale back my stuff, the more the stuff pile seems to grow. The pile is now in a neutral state. It’s amazing how much those items own me, but I’m glad to have some stuff on land for when I want to spend time in the mountains again. Skiing, rock climbing, and camping gear mostly. A few instruments, some kitchen gear, and a bin full of stuff for when it’s time to work on Satori again. Next time I am back I will take another stab at reducing even more unneeded stuff. The car and storage is everything left from a two bedroom house with a big back yard and awesome garden. At one point there was a flock of six chickens, a cat and Sasha the pup. The back yard had a garage full of yard and garden equipment, an old rotten fishing boat, some broken lawnmowers, lots of wood, a fire pit, a chicken tractor, and a trailered wooden sailing dinghy. The garden supplied a massive amount of food, and the chickens supplied more than two dozen eggs per week during the summer months. I miss the chickens and fresh vegetables, but I’ve traded for fresh seafood and the freedom to roam.

Winter Trials with new boom rigging. Sail shape is much flatter than before.
Winter Trials with new boom rigging. Sail shape is much flatter than before.

I’ve worked out the kinks on the new reefing lines after a quick cruise last Sunday. Just enough wind to make it fun, but not too much to need a reef in the jib, or a double reef in the main. Just one reef to keep her helmsman relaxed. Temperatures were okay for February, and the crew seemed to enjoy getting out. I decided after the boom was finished and I knew Satori was okay to venture, I would head out and work remotely pretty much indefinitely. The only reason I would need to come back to Seattle is to try to pair down my storage until I’m satisfied, and pick up any mail that I did not forward on to wherever I will be. I don’t really need my car except to move things out of storage, or to run errands in town. I’m pretty well outfitted so I only need to resupply food and water for the next month or two. I can also stretch my cellular internet so I have enough data to keep working without running out. A combination of working from coffee shops, and staying away from downloading movies will allow me to live pretty much anywhere in the American Salish Sea, but will also enjoy the convenience of part time at a marina. I can pay a daily rate when I want to come into a marina, then when I am able to roam again I can either anchor, or tie to a state park mooring ball. There are plenty of them unoccupied this time of year, and plenty of transient slips available. The only thing I need to be careful of is staying protected from strong winds and swell. I don’t mind anything under twenty-five knots, but ten to twenty knots gives me more peace of mind. Enough to keep the wind turbine running, but not so much that I worry about my anchor holding. I will retreat to a marina as an excuse to dodge wind storms, but also to resupply and be social.

New rigging, flat sail
New rigging, flat sail

I am subletting my Shilshole slip so I am not paying for an empty slip, and to subsidize the cost of staying as a guest and paying a daily rate. The maximum rate I can imagine would be having to pay for the slip in Seattle, then paying a daily rate for an entire month. The combination would equal to about $1800, and is prohibitive. Ideally I only need to visit marinas to provision and during windy storms. Most of the time I can anchor in protected bays, and take the dinghy to shore twice or three times per day for the pup. I am starting with an estimation of eight to ten days per month at a marina, and the rest of the time I will be anchored or tied to a mooring ball. This will keep my mooring cost to no more than $400 per month, which will be more than $200 cheaper than my mooring at Shilshole marina. I may decide to settle somewhere for longer term, but hopefully I will have not made my decision too late, and end up paying for too many days in a row. As a counter issue for not having shore power, I will be using more diesel fuel to heat the stove. The cost per month will be anywhere from $70 to $120 per month if I am using it every day. If we have freezing temperatures I will be running the stove pretty hot to keep the hull ventilated and as dry as possible, which can use as much as two gallons per day. I may also decide to run the portable generator instead of heading back to a marina slip to fully charge the batteries. I should be able to get three to four days with just the wind turbine and little sun we have near the forty-ninth parallel. As the weather changes into spring, I will end up adding more solar panels to the array. I am also planning on rewiring the circuit, and adding an ammeter so I can monitor the solar output directly.

See ya Seattle!
See ya Seattle!

Day of departure

I’m tied to a mooring ball at Blind Island, just before sunset. Getting here took about eleven hours, with much of it motoring in a little wind. The king tides right now are moving quite a bit of current, so I averaged about seven knots on the way. Around Edmonds I was sailing with the yankee jib and doing about seven knots over ground. Once I was closer to Point No Point the winds and waves built to gusts up to thirty knots of apparent wind, and three to four foot waves. The transition between jib and staysail was not ideal. I guess I’m a little rusty, or have higher expectations on how efficient I should be at getting the jib furled and staysail hoisted. When I raised the staysail I didn’t check to make sure the tack was tight, so at first the staysail was not giving any power and Satori was getting thrown around by the waves. The tiller pilot was useless at that point, but I didn’t setup the wind vane. In hindsight I should have since Pluto the tiller pilot is limited to relatively calm seas. It’s amazing how much more stable she becomes when a sail is putting pressure on the mast. I was running directly downwind most of the way, and at one point when I was trying to get the tiller pilot to behave, the staysail jibed and backed. The tiller pilot could not keep her course, so I ended up hand steering to ensure the staysail was doing it’s job, and we could continue safely on course. In hindsight I should have had the wind vane setup. Eventually the winds and seas calmed and I resorted to motoring again. I was planning on staying the night in Port Townsend but I was lined up to cross the strait at slack tide, and the winds did not look to be too bad. A last minute decision while on a course for the marina, I tacked and set a course for the San Juan Channel between San Juan Island and Lopez Island. I would either make it to Friday Harbor, or all the way to Shaw Island by dark. It’s nice to be back on the water, and enjoying a calm night in a remote bay. Tomorrow we have a short trip around the north end of San Juan Island so we can enjoy some time at English Camp, and Garrison Bay.

Mooring at Blind Island, Blind Bay, Shaw Island after sixty-five miles from Seattle.
Mooring at Blind Island, Blind Bay, Shaw Island after sixty-five miles from Seattle.

Onward to Garrison

Blind Bay on Shaw Island is a peaceful place in comparison to anywhere south of the Strait of Juan de Fuca. The mooring ball is inline with the wake from the Shaw Island ferry, and just about any other boat who is transiting Wasp Passage. The entire night I don’t think I felt anything at all. In the morning I was awoken by a Bald Eagle who I later learned is nested on Blind Island. After our trip to the island I put the dinghy on the foredeck and motored towards Roche Harbor and Garrison Bay. The entire way I only saw crab fisherman checking their pots and harvesting Dungeness and Rock crab. It was pouring rain with variable winds so I ramped the throttle to 3500 rpm and reused a set of waypoints I setup on the chart app this summer to get through both Wasp Passage and Mosquito Pass. Neither had much current running through the narrowest parts but I still decided to hand steer through them so I could keep the boat moving more efficiently. I didn’t realize how dirty Satori has become on her topsides and hull so I took some time to scrub the deck and try to organize the gear. The winds were very strange when I finally dropped anchor. At first they were coming from the south, but then backed from the east, and then from the north. I realized I was pretty close to the shore in Garrison Bay and watched the depth show as little as two feet under her hull. Fortunately it was at the lowest tide, and by tomorrow’s next low tide I will kedge another anchor and move her so she is a little further from the shore. I didn’t get a chance to check out English Camp today. It was pouring cats and dogs so after the trip we just took it easy and cooked some food. Tomorrow we will venture out for a few hours and have a look at the park. The wind is blowing enough to keep the wind turbine running. I’m also impressed with how little it takes to keep the boat warm inside. I have a low flow pump for circulating glycol in the stove, also a couple of LED lights, the entire boat network including the wifi hotspot, the stove fan, and a circulation fan running and am only taking 1.3 amps from the battery. The fridge has been kept a little cooler because it is full of perishables, and I also want to be able to turn it off at night to lower my energy needs. The fridge gets down to thirty-four degrees during the day, and then in the morning it’s up to thirty-nine degrees. The top items in the cold plate are thawing, which is good because I rotate the meats that I plan on cooking. Whatever is on top is getting eaten in the next few days.

Heading through Wasp Passage using waypoints to guide me in torrential rain
Heading through Wasp Passage using waypoints to guide me in torrential rain

English Camp

I have not seen a day so calm for as long as I can remember. Absolutely nothing but birds audible. When I’m in the cabin I can only hear the fridge cycling on and off. I spent lunchtime roaming around English Camp with the pup. We immediately encountered a retired couple with a herding dog. Given the couples’ history it is a fit breed for them. They are retired farmers who bought property in Wescott Bay. The wife was a passionate show jumper and owned several Dutch Warmbloods. After they left I was the only person visible other than a park ranger who was going through a checklist of maintenance. We wandered around checking out the property adjacent to the waterfront. The entire area is picturesque and somewhat perfect for my first full day at anchor. The afternoon temperature reached sixty-five Fahrenheit and without wind. Seagulls, goldeneyes, and eagles occupied the majority of the sounds on the water. The only boat to visit the bay was an aboriginal crabbing boat, checking their pots scattered in all of the bays on the island. I’ll stay here until the weekend, then head into Roche Harbor to provision and do laundry. I’m very happy to be in a remote anchorage, enjoying solitude for a while.

Nice day in Garrison Bay. Blue skies and sun is a welcoming sight
Nice day in Garrison Bay. Blue skies and sun is a welcoming sight

English Camp Day Two

I realized I still had my port light covers on last night. When I’m at the marina I feel like the boat is a fishbowl, so I made a set of covers to provide privacy. While I’m on the hook privacy is abundant. I’ve decided to pull the dinghy onto the foredeck before I go to bed, and put it back in the water on the first run to shore. This allows me to quickly pull anchor and get under-weigh without worrying about getting the dingy on board first. Tomorrow the winds are supposed to pick up and blow into the twenties, then Friday into the high thirties and low forties. I’m going to move into Roche Harbor marina for tomorrow night to recharge the batteries, fill the fuel and water, do laundry, and maybe pick up a few things at the grocery. My electricity needs and the lack of enough sun or wind has required me to run the portable generator for the past couple of days. I make the best of it by taking Sasha to shore while it’s running so I’m not bothered by the noise. It’s barely audible on shore and it sips fuel so it’s a great supplement to solar, wind, and shore power. On our second trip to shore at low tide I found some oysters, but didn’t have anything to pry them off the rocks or open the shells. On my way back to the boat the pull cord for the outboard finally parted ways, so I rowed back and spent an hour figuring out how to replace the cord. After several attempts I was able to get a length of Amsteel Dyneema attached, which should prevent the cord from ever parting during for the duration of it’s service life. We harvested the oysters and enjoyed them with seared ahi for dinner. I’m really enjoying this life, but also enjoying getting into a rhythm that is very different than being on land, or tied to a dock at a big marina. I watched a bald eagle swoop down and catch a fish, then bring it up into a madrona tree to eat it. This is something I should be seeing a lot more often.

English Camp and Garrison Bay. Satori is just around the point from the dingy dock.
English Camp and Garrison Bay. Satori is just around the point from the dingy dock.
Fresh fried pacific oysters from Garrison Bay
Fresh fried pacific oysters from Garrison Bay

Roche Harbor

It was light winds all morning. I pulled the anchor by hand and left it on the foredeck to dry. I could see some blue in the skies and the sun was planning to shine for a while. I waited until lunchtime to motor into Roche Harbor, through Mosquito Pass. The trip was quick, and I was lucky to get a windward tie to the dock. To my starboard and across the dock is another Westsail 32, and to my port side is a Westsail 43 ketch. The harbor is completely empty. The only people around are people who work there, but the docks were empty, as well as the village. A few hours later I did get a visitor who came to visit with Sasha, and Dave also happened to own the Westsail 32. Two Westsail boat owners together is like meeting someone you don’t know from your own tribe. All Westsail owners are in various levels of refitting their boat, and Dave was carting a pile of various paints and other chemicals, along with portable power tools. Virtually the same pile I kept in my dock box, which has gone to into storage while I live on the hook, so to speak.  I’ve taken the opportunity to do some laundry, which cost six dollars for one load to wash and dry. I’m expecting it to blow in the morning so I’ve removed some things from the topsides. I have also secured Satori with several spring lines to make it an easy ride. Being pushed away from the dock is better than against, and from what Dave says the forecast can be quite a bit under the actual wind speed. Satori will be blown sideways which means I will need to go outside and make sure everything is okay early in the morning. For now I hear nothing except the dog snoring and my keyboard keys getting tapped on.

Secured to the Roche Harbor marina slip during an expected near gale
Secured to the Roche Harbor marina slip during an expected near gale

Garrison Bay and beyond

I decided to head back to Garrison and decide where to go next after work. The winds did pick up and blew pretty well this morning, but not forty knots. Maybe the maximum wind speed was thirty knots, but I suppose it’s better to be safe than have regrets about not hiding out in a marina. I ate lunch at the infamous Lime Kiln Cafe while I continued working on the laptop. After I filled the water tanks and vacuumed the cabin, I started the engine and warped the boat down to the end of the dock. The wind was blowing fifteen to twenty knots and I had to cast off without help. I knew the wind would blow the bow down and away from the docks so I just untied the lines, put it in reverse and waited for a gust to turn her around. Once I was outside of the marina waves increased to chop. Getting through Mosquito Pass wasn’t too challenging. I was close to low slack tide so the currents were not very strong, but the winds grew to almost thirty knots, and the waves were stacked and had swelled to a few feet. I knew once I was past the section that is exposed to Haro Strait near Hanbury Point, the seas would calm down and the winds would’t be as strong. Getting into Garrison Bay and dropping anchor was somewhat uneventful and relatively easy. I prepared the anchor and chain while I had a chance under autopilot so I could run forward quickly and get it down to an eight-to-one scope. Once Satori started to turn and drift back onto her rode, I put the throttle down in reverse to set the hook well. She set and came right back with her bow on the wind. An hour later the winds subsided, and as I type this they have completely disappeared. The wind put a chill to my bones so I have the stove cranked, along with my forced air heater, and even added the ships lantern. It will be too hot in another hour and I can turn everything down. Tonight I am cooking a beef roast in the pressure cooker, and then planning a new location for next week’s adventures. It’s been a great week and I think I will get used to living like this. I am fortunate to be able to experience a mild winter on a sailboat exploring the San Juan Islands.

Beef roast in a pressure cooker
Beef roast in a pressure cooker
Categories
Engine Fall Live Aboard Living Pacific Northwest Rebuilds Repairs

Engine Love in the Fall

It’s been a couple of months since I have written about Satori. The last sailing trip was in October, for Race Your House. Between September and October I had some of my favorite days on the water. I did a solo run down to Blake Island to raft up with some friends, then did a little spinnaker run to prepare for the only race Satori has been in since I bought her. Now that it’s blowing gales and snowing in the mountains, I have a little break to talk about project season.

Satori and her crew sailing in the Race Your House Regatta
Satori and her crew sailing in the Race Your House Regatta. Photo by Mark Aberle, copied from Off the Coast of Ballard.
Race Your House 2015 - photo by Gary Peterson
Race Your House 2015 – photo by Gary Peterson

The first topic is the jiffy reefing system. I’ve never been a fan of how she’s rigged. You generally want to be on a starboard tack when reefing the mainsail with the existing setup. Otherwise you’ll be on the leeward side of the boom when pulling the clew cringle down. Usually when you’re reefing the wind has picked up enough to buck the boat bit. The first reef isn’t too bad, but the second reef is a ride that is better suited on the windward side of the mast when reefing. I decided to focus on the engine this fall and winter, and since Satori was out of commission I could also work on her boom. The day after the race, I took all of her sails down and put them in a dry place until I’m finished. I also took the boom off and stripped all of the hardware off so I could work on it alongside of the engine project. I plan to add winches and run lines to both sides of the boom, through rope clutches to make reefing much easier.

Showing a single reef with the clew cringle crossing over to eliminate the friction caused by the sail bunching up under the reefing line
Showing a single reef with the clew cringle line crossing over to eliminate the friction caused by the sail bunching up under the reefing line. This will be eliminated with the new setup.

Satori’s engine was installed by Stewarts Marine here in Ballard. The day the owners motored away with the new Bukh DV 36 was on June 6th, 1986. By June 2016, Satori’s engine will be thirty years old. When I bought Satori, she had a little more than five-hundred hours on the engine which is not much at all, but she was showing signs of severe corrosion on the starboard side of the engine. This was from weeping of seawater due to worn seals on the impeller water pump, and some poorly sealed hoses. To recap the amount of work I have already completed… The original water lift muffler had some pinholes that was causing it to corrode. The old Racor filter looked a bit old and I wasn’t able to find any replacement filters any longer. The original fuel lines were also starting to leak due to plastic fittings wearing out and hose that was at it’s final days. I addressed the fuel lines first. Later I added a new muffler. I lost part of the summer sailing last year due to an oil pipe bursting. I placed an order from Bukh for the new parts, which took the better part of a month. Since then I have only replaced the oil and fuel filters, plus made an attempt to reduce the corrosion by spraying solvents onto the effected area. I’m sure that addressing it sooner would have been better, but I put other projects in front of the line until the fall weather settled in. Now that we have periods of monsoon rains and cold temperatures, I can finally address the issues once and for all. Instead of just replacing the water pump, I decided to replace the entire cooling system and service the parts that remain in good condition. It may seem hard to believe but I am really enjoying this project.

Showing the corrosion and original oil pipe prior to repair in 2014
Showing the corrosion and original oil pipe prior to repair in 2014
Engine block and mount prior to cleaning the iron oxide
Engine block and mount prior to cleaning the iron oxide
Beginning of the clean up project
Beginning of the clean up project with attempts to extract the rusted bolts.

I started by removing all hoses, rubber end caps, pipes, heat exchangers, water pump, and anything else related to the cooling system. I was a little concerned that I would not be able to find replacement parts, but I was relieved to find all of the parts available in the US and UK via mail order. The first thing to address while I wait for parts delivery is the corroded engine mount. The bolts attached to the mounting bracket were heavily corroded, and possibly bonded to the engine. I began scraping and brushing away the iron oxide until I could see the shiny steel underneath. I started to turn the first bolt head, but it would not budge, and ended up stripping the bolt even more. While I was working on the engine mount, I decided to take a look at the front engine mounts to see the difference. When I looked at the bracket I realized that the bolts had completely sheared away, leaving the bracket disconnected from the block. This was an unexpected situation and needed to be addressed immediately. I removed the front mounting bracket which revealed the sheared bolts. Fortunately I had enough space to work on drilling out the bolts. Over the next week I proceeded to drill out the first bolt and remove it with an extractor. The second one would not come out with soaked aero-kroil or torch, so I drilled it out and tapped it for installing a heli-coil. I double stacked two coils and added Loctite to keep the bolt torqued down.

Engine mount sheared bolts
Engine mount sheared bolts
Using an extractor to remove a sheared bolt
Using an extractor to remove a sheared bolt
Cleaned mounting bracket and new bolts with heli-coil
Cleaned mounting bracket and new bolts with heli-coil

After the unexpected distraction I moved onto the oil coolant pipes, front mounting bracket, and heat exchangers. I brought them into a machine shop so they could soak everything in a hot tank. Hopefully it would strip most of the paint off and clean the steel parts a bit. In hindsight I should have just used  phosphoric acid to clean them due to the expensive price of $45 for bathing. I took the parts to a wire brush on the end of a drill to bring the parts down to mostly bare metal again. After seeing the oil heat exchanger transform into a shiny brass lantern, I bought some high-temp clear paint to allow the brass to keep shining. The coolant pipes and engine mount were painted red after a coat of ospho for converting the surface oxide to a ready-to-paint surface . I was able to work another corroded engine block bolt out and replace it as well. I ordered some new custom hoses, heat exchanger end caps, and put the water pump on order. The turn around time is apparently a month and a half before the pump is delivered to the parts dealer here in Seattle. Until then I’ve decided to clean up the engine and repaint part of it where the water pump has caused severe corrosion. I have also decided to find a drain for the stainless steel water lift muffler. I received a brass plug when I had the muffler fabricated, but that has since corroded severely. After only one and a half years I’m already repairing the plug to allow the seawater to drain easily into the bilge. I will keep working on preparing the engine for painting by removing corrosion, and cleaning the surface back down to bare metal again. Some areas will receive just a little touchup paint, but others will be prepped with ospho and then painted over with a couple of coats of red krylon rattle can paint. I sent the oil in to have analyzed so I can keep an eye on the level of iron and calcium in the oil. I should have a good sense of the amount of degradation that is to be expected with the piston compression based on how fast it’s loosing metal. Three samples over the next year can tell me how much I should be concerned.

Cooling system parts after removing from the engine
Cooling system parts after removing from the engine
Oil heat exchanger before cleaning
Oil heat exchanger before cleaning
Oil heat exchanger after polishing
Oil heat exchanger after polishing
The seawater heat exchanger looks surprisingly good considering the age of it. Not much needed to get this cleaned up.
The seawater heat exchanger looks surprisingly good considering the age of it. Not much needed to get this cleaned up.

The next phase will be removing the rear mounting bracket, and getting it repaired or replaced with a new one. Once the engine is cleaned up and painted around the engine mount, I can install the bracket and put the cooling system back together. Although I won’t have repaired all of the corrosion, I will be more confident that it will not continue as it did. The rest of the engine could be cleaned and touched up over time, without worrying about any further damage. It’s a serious challenge to decide where to stop repairing. I have heard several people suggest pulling it out, but that would cost me a considerable amount of money. If I removed it I would need to have someone transport it to somewhere I can work on it. I would need to pay someone to give me the space to work on it, plus a daily rental charge for the engine stand. If I keep the engine inside of the boat I have all of the time that I need to get the engine done. There will be other projects down the road to address some of the foreseen issues. I only need to decide what will be acceptable to leave as is until I have more downtime to address the next corroded part. Hopefully when I post about the engine project completion it will still be 2015. I don’t expect the boom to be finished by then, but that’s okay. I’ll motor to weather and run with the foresails.

The caliper and micrometer are invaluable for taking measurements for getting replacement parts.
The caliper and micrometer are invaluable for taking measurements for getting replacement parts.
Categories
Live Aboard Living Pacific Northwest San Juan Islands

Fair Winds in the San Juans

Nine days away from Seattle was perfect. I had plenty of data in my Verizon hotspot to supply me with internet for the duration. I also did an oil and filter change, plus a new filter and water drain in the Racor 500 fuel separator. I wanted to do more but this would be okay until I get home and have more time to work on the engine. The water tanks were topped off right before I left and I had plenty of food and beverages to keep going without having to stop in a town to resupply. Satori was in ship shape for the San Juans and I had everything in order. This time I took a touring kayak so I could cruise around the island with something that did not consume fuel. I also brought the paddle board, so I had four different means of getting around while away. I did some scrubbing of the hull with my new wetsuit, replaced the zincs on the bobstay fitting and prop shaft, I rigged new reefing lines, plus a new outhaul system. The chain rode was also moved down and back to keep the bow light and I decided to use the old three-strand rode to learn about anchoring using line instead of chain. I also rigged the staysail boom in case I wanted to fly all three sails during a broad or beam reach. The fuel tanks were full and Satori couldn’t have been much more ready to leave the big city.

Using the GoPro iPhone app I was able to capture the spinnaker while the camera was raised up the halyard.
Using the GoPro iPhone app I was able to capture the spinnaker while the camera was raised up the halyard.

I left Seattle around 7am, which was during the outgoing tide. Getting north was no problem and at times I reached 10 knots with the boat going 5.5 knots and the current hitting 4.5 knots. Once through Admiralty Inlet it was just after slack tide, then heading north was during the incoming tide. This is the best way to get north quickly, and I will always follow this pattern when trying to travel long distances and make good time. I decided to stay in Anacortes the first night and try staying the night next to Cap Sante Marina. There is risk of running aground but if you follow the outside dredged lane southward to the first green buoy and then head towards shore, there is no risk of getting bottomed out as it stays above twelve feet until close to shore. The bottom is also very muddy so I knew it would hold well. The night turned out to be uneventful, but before leaving the next morning it seemed that the entire marina decided to go boating. The anchorage ended up becoming a choppy mess from all of the power boats heading out. If you are thinking about staying in Anacortes, consider other anchorages nearby with less boat traffic. Anacortes is a shitty spot to spend the night unless you make a very early departure.

Preset waypoints. Cruising speed over ground was as much as ten knots with the tide.
Preset waypoints. Cruising speed over ground was as much as ten knots with the tide.

 

I pulled anchor and raised sails as soon as I could, heading northeast around Guemes Island. At one point the winds died and I eventually motored back into the wind, then went under sail again. I tacked many times while staying close hauled to Doe Bay through channels and around many islands, just to warm up for the week of sailing around the islands. Beating to weather with inconsistent winds, opposing currents and lots of land in between put Satori close to Doe Bay but I was finally swept by the currents and out of frustration I fired up the engine and motored to the new anchorage. I wanted to experiment with a new technique on using a bridle to position Satori’s bow into the waves created by other vessels heading down Rosario Strait but still keep her held by anchor. When the winds were up I could maintain a solid position and ride waves from the bow but when the winds died she would move out of control and using a bridle proved to be of no use.

Doe Bay Resort artisan foods
Doe Bay Resort artisan foods

 

Office at Doe Bay
Office at Doe Bay

 

Spending the night in Doe Bay provides a nice way to save money but also enjoy the resort as a guest. Eliminate the $100 – 200 per night lodging cost anchoring.  The food at their cafe is spectacular and reasonably priced. Also for a small fee of $10 you can spend a couple of hours soaking in one of the three soaking pools in their spa. Clothing is optional and the temperature of each tub goes from warm to too hot. A nice way to finish off the night before heading back to the boat. After a nice cafe breakfast the next morning, I spent the day working on my laptop on the boat. Reception was a little iffy so I decided to raise the hotspot up the flag halyard, which resolved the issue and allowed me to keep working until it was time to head off to Sucia Island. There were very little winds so I motored out towards Fox Cove and anchored in the channel between Little Sucia and Fox Cove. It was approximately the same place I had first ever anchored Satori, or any sailboat, and was in a spectacular position for the night. A couple I ran into in Fox Cove remembered Satori back when the previous owner was still living aboard in Semiahmoo and mentioned the space station flying overhead at 11pm. At 11pm on the nose I watched the station come into view next the the brightest star on the horizon, then watched it speed up as it came overhead, then disappear on horizon over Sucia. To imagine a woman has been living on that flying spaceship for six months is astounding.

Fox Cove, Sucia Island - Strait of Georgia is the gap in the center of the photo.
Fox Cove, Sucia Island – Strait of Georgia is the gap in the center of the photo.

 

Around 1am the winds backed from the Northwest. Perhaps the worse position to be was in that channel while the winds built and the seas grew. By 3am the fetch coming from the Strait of Georgia caused the current to speed up and put me into an eddy with breakers nearby. By 5am I decided that the anchor rode was not in a good position. Because of the currents I was no longer getting held bow to the waves and wind. She would sail through the current into the eddy, then get caught and sweep back into the current again. The other issue I noticed was the angle of the rode would run back to the stern of the boat. I decided I didn’t like it any longer and moved into Fox Cove until the that afternoon, then moved around into Fossil Bay so I could be protected from both North and South exposure. Once I dropped anchor I realized that I was the only boat in the bay using their anchor. Everyone else was tied to the park buoys instead. I was far enough towards Mud Bay that I didn’t worry about it. Lots of mud underneath. I also discovered an old relic of an iron boiler that likely came from the abandoned steamship left in Echo Bay in 1902. It’s located north of the Mud Bay entrance on the other shore just under the waterline. After spending the day in Fossil Bay I decided to head to Friday Harbor for the night so I could pick up some groceries. Sailing down the President and San Juan Channels were spectacular. Winds were fifteen to twenty knots and I enjoyed staying as close hauled as possible, which meant hand steering to keep her moving fast enough and close enough to only need a few tacks before close reaching to Friday Harbor.  I kept my waypoints from my last visit so I was able to anchor a little deeper into the bay just north of the marina.

Fossil Bay, Sucia Island. Taken from Mud Bay
Fossil Bay, Sucia Island. Taken from Mud Bay

 

I spent half the day working from The Bean Cafe, which has friendly servers and is in a good environment to leave Sasha leashed outside. Just about every person had a chance to play with Sasha and say hello. Half of the customers is enough to satisfy her needs of attention beyond myself for the rest of the week. The winds began building during the day and by mid-afternoon they were gusting pretty good. I decided to finish up work from the boat and have a look at the anchorage. Satori was in a good position but she was sitting on the lee of the bay so if the winds built anymore, she may drag and run aground. On the way to the boat a young guy and I had a chat and when I mentioned a Westsail, he said it was his dream boat. I offered him to visit while I was getting the boat put away so I could sail to a more protected bay. I recognized his voice from Shilshole Marina and discovered he once lived aboard his boat near my dock, and shared the laundry facilities. He and his girlfriend decided to move into the San Juans and he took a job with vessel assist. His story of crossing the Columbia River bar at max ebb with an inexperienced crew brought back memories of my own adventures. I think we both share the ambition to sail to the South Pacific, as well as sailing in heavy weather and currents. We exchanged info and he left me with a new experience of grapefruit cider to find when I get home.

Getting under-weight in Friday Harbor. Satori motored from the anchorage and ran downwind in twenty knot winds.
Getting under-weight in Friday Harbor. Satori motored from the anchorage and ran downwind in twenty knot winds.

 

Blind Bay, Shaw Island
Blind Bay, Shaw Island

 

For whatever reason I was a little nervous about getting into twenty knot winds. Perhaps it was the amount of other boats nearby, the confines of passages and channels and not having a staysail to keep Satori steady. I saw twenty-six knots on the instrument but it really wan’t anything I couldn’t handle. It was downwind through the windiest parts and then the winds died completely once I was reaching west. Getting into anchorage at Shaw Island was no problem, and the wind speed and direction were much better for staying the night at anchorage. Through the night and the next morning the winds never reached beyond fifteen knots. I am uncertain what they were back in Friday Harbor. The next morning I ended up sailing to Rosario Strait but once in the strait the winds died so I motored back to Anacortes. By the time I was at anchor it was getting dark. The next morning I woke up and was under-weigh by 6:00 am. I was hauling ass through the strait so I lowered my throttle so I could time the slack tide getting through Admiralty Inlet. The seas were calm and there were very little winds. Getting through was easy and due to lack of winds I continued motoring until around Point No Point in Puget Sound. I raised the spinnaker for about an hour, making good time but then again the winds died. I motored the rest of the way back to Shilshole.

Cap Sante anchorage with oil refinery in the background. Not a very peaceful place.
Cap Sante anchorage with oil refinery in the background. Not a very peaceful place.

 

Sasha sleeping in the spinnaker
Sasha sleeping in the spinnaker

I’ve taken a week off from sailing. The mainsail cover project has been started, storm sails are completed and ready to pick up from Schattauer, and I have done an excellent job procrastinating on the staysail deck hardware project. I spent some time cleaning the exterior teak, some interior reorganizing, replaced the engine fuel filter and engine coolant. The pace at which I am able to continue accomplishing each task has been manageable. Satori’s blog has been relocated to a new domain, and I’ve added a YouTube channel so I can share video along with the photos available through this blog. I doubt I will have time to edit stories but I’m happy with simply providing to you short cuts of some of the sailing adventures I’ve been enjoying. I will also try to dig into the video archive and post some of the past cuts I have never published. I hope you enjoy this next phase of Satori’s refit and adventures. Enjoy the summer.